Skip to main content
Find a Lawyer
Please enter a legal issue and/or a location
Begin typing to search, use arrow keys to navigate, use enter to select

State Offices or Programs Associated With Indoor Air Impact on Health

Each state has programs for measuring or investigating air quality. These programs help property owners, businesses, and the public at large. They promote a healthy environment for all state residents. They also allow concerned citizens to make their voices heard by reporting air quality concerns.

The outdoor and indoor environment can be affected by many harmful contaminants. These include radon, asbestos, mold, and pesticides. Other dangerous particulates and allergens include:

  • Tobacco smoke, secondhand smoke, and other indoor air pollutants
  • Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as paints, lacquers, and formaldehyde
  • Dangerous chemicals in air conditioning (HVAC), known as fluorinated hydrocarbons
  • Dust mites, insects, and other bugs

High concentrations of harmful emissions can create negative health effects. This includes lung cancer, heart disease, and other long-term health issues. Health professionals across the country do their best to raise awareness. Environmental epidemiology experts have taken many clean air initiatives. Still, more can be done by raising awareness of environmental safety. If you're concerned about air quality, consider talking to:

  • People in your home, friends, and colleagues
  • Building managers and building occupants (especially in dense office buildings)
  • Administrators who provide tools for schools and academic institutions to fight pollution

A great way to promote environmental safety is to contact your state's health department. They can address your concerns about any indoor or outdoor air pollution. They can provide you with technical assistance, risk assessment, and remediation information. These resources can help promote fresh air and reduce health problems.

This section contains links to state offices and fact sheets dealing with air-related health inquiries. At the federal government level, you can consult with federal agencies such as the:

Alabama

Indoor Air Quality/Lead Branch (Dept. of Public Health)

ADEM Environmental Programs (Alabama Dept. of Environmental Management)

Alaska

Air Quality Office (Dept. of Environmental Conservation)

Arizona

Department of Environmental Quality (Dept. of Health Services)

Arkansas

Air Division (Dept. of Environmental Quality)

California

Indoor Air Quality Program (IAQ) (Dept. of Health Services)

Air Resources Board (California Environmental Protection Agency)

Colorado

Indoor Air Quality (Dept. of Public Health and Environment)

Connecticut

Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) (Dept. of Public Health)

Delaware

Indoor Air Quality Information (Dept. of Health and Social Services)

District of Columbia (Washington, DC)

Air Quality Division (Dept. of the Environment)

Florida

Indoor Air Toxics Program (Dept. of Health)

Georgia

Indoor Air Quality (Dept. of Public Health)

Hawaii

Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Section (Dept. of Health)

Idaho

Indoor Environment program (Dept. of Health & Welfare)

Illinois

Bureau of Air (Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA)

Common Questions and Answers About Indoor Mold (Dept. of Public Health)

Indiana

Office of Air Quality (OAQ) (Dept. of Environmental Management)

Indoor Air Quality Program (Marion County Health Department)

Iowa

Air Quality Bureau (Dept. of Natural Resources)

Kansas

Bureau of Air (Dept. of Health and Environment)

Kentucky

Division for Air Quality (Dept. for Environmental Protection)

Louisiana

Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Education Service (Dept. of Health and Hospitals)

Maine

Bureau of Air Quality (Dept. of Environment Protection)

Maryland

Air and Radiation Programs (Dept. of the Environment)

Massachusetts

Indoor Air Quality Unit (Health and Human Services)

Michigan

Air Quality Division (AQD) (Dept. of Environmental. Quality)

Minnesota

Air Quality (Dept. of Health)

Mississippi

Air Division (Dept. of Environmental Quality)

Carbon Monoxide (Dept. of Health)

Missouri

How Is the Air? (Dept. of Natural Resources)

Montana

Air Quality (Department of Health)

Nebraska

Indoor Air Quality Program (Dept. of Health and Human Services)

Nevada

Air (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection)

New Hampshire

Air Quality (Dept. of Environmental Services)

New Jersey

Air Quality (Dept. of Environmental Protection)

New Mexico

Air Quality Bureau (New Mexico Environment Dept.)

New York

Air Quality (Dept. of Health)

North Carolina

Indoor Environmental Quality (Dept. of Health and Human Services)

North Dakota

Division of Air Quality (Dept. of Health - Environmental Health)

Ohio

Air Pollution Control (Environmental Protection Agency)

Oklahoma

Air Quality Division (Dept. of Environmental Quality)

Oregon

Air Quality (Oregon Department of Environmental Quality)

Pennsylvania

Bureau of Air Quality (Dept. of Environmental Protection)

Rhode Island

Air Quality (Department of Health)

South Carolina

Air Quality (Dept. of Health and Environmental Control)

South Dakota

Air Quality Program (Dept. of Agriculture and Natural Resources)

Tennessee

Division of Air Pollution Control (Dept. of Environment & Conservation)

Texas

Air Quality (Commission on Environmental Quality)

Utah

Division of Air Quality (Dept. of Environmental Quality)

Vermont

Air Quality and Climate Division (Dept. of Environmental Conservation)

Virginia

Air (Dept. of Environmental Quality)

Washington

Air Quality (Department of Ecology)

West Virginia

Radiation, Toxics & Indoor Air Division (Dept. of Health & Human Resources)

Wisconsin

Air Quality (Dept. of Health Services)

Wyoming

Air Quality Division (Dept. of Environmental Quality)

Still Having Issues? Contact an Environmental Attorney

Preserving the environment is a monumental effort. Sometimes, it's not enough to raise awareness to friends and coworkers. Calling government offices might not always get you results, either. If you're struggling with air quality problems, contact an environmental lawyer today.

Was this helpful?

You Don’t Have To Solve This on Your Own – Get a Lawyer’s Help

Meeting with a lawyer can help you understand your options and how to best protect your rights. Visit our attorney directory to find a lawyer near you who can help.

Or contact an attorney near you:

Next Steps

Contact a qualified personal injury attorney to make sure your rights are protected.

Begin typing to search, use arrow keys to navigate, use enter to select

Help Me Find a Do-It-Yourself Solution

Copied to clipboard

Find a Lawyer

More Options