Divorce Information by State

The laws and procedures for getting a divorce differ by state and sometimes even by county. Each will have its own rules for the divorce petition and filing fees. There are different residency requirements and waiting periods in each state.

When it comes to a possible divorce, the last thing you want to do is to go into the process unprepared. You will have many questions. How do I get a court order for child support and child custody? Can I get spousal support or alimony? What is “marital property"? Does my state have “no-fault divorce"? What if we have an uncontested divorce or a contested divorce case?

Below, find links to helpful divorce resources and legal information for each state to prepare you for family court and the divorce process. You can also review FindLaw's state law-specific Family Law Forms page for more details.

To suggest a resource for this page, please e-mail us.

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

District of Columbia

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

  • Divorce (Tennessee Alliance for Legal Services)

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

Get More Information About Divorce in Your State by Talking to an Attorney

Divorce laws and procedures vary from state to state. It is helpful to seek professional legal advice. Luckily, a local family law attorney will be familiar with your state's divorce laws and can help protect your rights during the divorce process. Find a lawyer who specializes in divorce near you today. Get help with your divorce and ease some of the stress caused by divorce.

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Can I Solve This on My Own or Do I Need an Attorney?

  • You may not need an attorney for a simple divorce with uncontested issues
  • Legal advice is critical to protect your interests in a contested divorce
  • Divorce lawyers can help secure fair custody/visitation, support, and property division

An attorney is a skilled advocate during negotiations and court proceedings. Many attorneys offer free consultations.

Find a local attorney

Don't Forget About Estate Planning

Divorce is an ideal time to review your beneficiary designations on life insurance, bank accounts, and retirement accounts. You need to change your estate planning forms to reflect any new choices about your personal representative and beneficiaries. You can change your power of attorney if you named your ex-spouse as your agent. Also, change your health care directive to remove them from making your health care decisions.

Start Planning