Child Custody Forms by State

Determining child custody is a very stressful process. Reviewing the forms ahead of time can ease the stress as you will be better able to answer the court's and your attorney's questions.

Below are links to child custody and visitation forms in each state. There is information on parenting plans and agreements where available. You may also find what you want on our state-specific family law pages.

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

District of Columbia

Florida

Georgia

Hawai'i

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

Filing Court Forms Generally

When dealing with child custody or parenting plans, filing forms with the court involves specific steps. First, visit the court clerk's office or use e-filing options, if available. Pay any required filing fees to start the process. Submit the necessary forms based on your jurisdiction. These forms might address important aspects of physical custody, such as time-sharing, support orders, or protective orders (in cases of child abuse or domestic violence). Sometimes, the court may issue temporary orders while you await a final decision. Ultimately, the court's involvement aims to ensure the minor child's welfare.

Get Professional Child Custody Help

Every state has different child custody forms. Knowing what forms are available from California to Texas and Utah to New York will help make the child custody process much more manageable. A great way to get a handle on child custody laws is to contact a family law attorney near you.

Many attorneys have experience handling child custody cases. They will help give you valuable legal advice. They can review your agreement by the child support guidelines of the state. Attorneys will help every step of the way until you receive a final custody order.

Speak to an experienced family law attorney near you today.

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Can I Solve This on My Own or Do I Need an Attorney?

  • Both parents can seek custody of their children — with or without an attorney
  • An attorney can help get the custody and visitation agreement you want
  • An attorney will advocate for your rights as a parent

A lawyer can help protect your rights and your children's best interests. Many attorneys offer free consultations.

Find a local attorney

Don't Forget About Estate Planning

Once new child custody arrangements are in place, it’s an ideal time to create or change your estate planning forms. Take the time to add new beneficiaries to your will and name a guardian for any minor children. Consider creating a financial power of attorney so your agent can pay bills and provide for your children. A health care directive explains your health care decisions and takes the decision-making burden off your children when they become adults.

Start Planning