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Felon Voting Laws By State

Almost all United States citizens who are not minors are eligible to vote. One notable exception is when a person has a felony conviction. Despite what many people think, there are no federal laws in place that regulate felon voting. Thus, until Congress passes a law to that effect, states must determine felon voting rights for both state and federal elections.

States follow different approaches to voter disenfranchisement. For instance, some states allow people with a felony conviction to vote even while incarcerated. Others require felons to complete their sentences before the state restores their voting rights. The following table lists out felon voting rights in each state.

State Felon Voting Laws
Alabama Once you complete your sentence (including probation or parole), you can apply for a Certificate of Eligibility to Register to Vote (CERV). Felons who committed ineligible convictions (such as rape or murder) must get a pardon from the Board of Pardons and Paroles before they can vote.
Alaska You can register to vote when you complete your sentence* (Alaska Statutes 15.05.030). If you have a felony involving moral turpitude on your record, you can register to vote when you are unconditionally discharged.
Arizona If you are a first-time offender, you can vote upon completion of probation and payment of any fine or restitution (A.R.S. Section 13-912). If you have two or more felonies on your record, the judge who discharges you at the end of the term of probation has to restore your voting rights. You can also apply to the court.
Arkansas You can vote once you complete your sentence (Ark. code ann. amend. 51, Section 11(d)(2)(a-d)).
California You can vote if you are released from prison and discharged from parole (California Assembly Bill AB2466). You can vote if you are still on probation.

Learn more on our page about felon voting rights in California.

Colorado You can register to vote after your release from prison. This includes those who are parolees or those under probation.
Connecticut Your voting rights will be automatically restored upon your release from prison and completion of your parole.
Delaware You can't vote if you are incarcerated, serving parole, or on probation (Delaware Code Title 15. Elections, Section 6103). If you have a disqualifying felony conviction you will permanently lose the right to vote unless you get a pardon.
District of Columbia You can vote after your release from prison.
Florida Amendment 4 restores the rights of voters with felony convictions after they complete their sentences, including probation and parole. People convicted of murder or a felony sexual offense are not covered under the amendment.

Learn more on our page about felon voting rights in Florida.

Georgia You are ineligible to vote if you have a felony conviction and are in prison, on probation, or on parole (Constitution of the State of Georgia Art. II, Section 1).
Hawaii If you have a felony conviction, you can vote after your release from prison (Constitution of the State of Hawaii Article 2, Section 2 and HI Rev Stat Section 831-2 (2014)).
Idaho You can vote if you complete your prison term, probation, and parole (Idaho Statutes Title 18. Crimes and Punishments, section 18-310).
Illinois You can vote after you have been released from prison (Illinois Statutes Chapter 730. Corrections, Section 5-5. Loss and Restoration of Rights).
Indiana You can vote after your release from prison.
Iowa The Iowa Constitution states you will permanently lose your voting rights if you have a felony conviction. Your rights are restored only by application to the Governor's office.
Kansas You cannot vote in Kansas if you have a felony conviction unless you complete your sentence* (Kansas Constitution Art. 5, Section 2).
Kentucky If you have a felony conviction, you are permanently excluded from voting. You can restore your voting rights through an executive pardon (Kentucky Constitution, Section 145).
Louisiana According to Act 636, if you have a felony conviction and are on probation or have been on supervision for five years after your release from prison, you can restore your voting rights.
Maine You can vote even when you are incarcerated.
Maryland You can vote after you serve your prison sentence (House Bill 980). You can't vote if you were convicted of buying or selling votes.
Massachusetts You can restore your voting rights after your release from prison (Mass. General Laws C.51, Section 1).
Michigan You can restore your voting rights after your release from prison (Michigan Constitution, Article 2).
Minnesota If you have a felony conviction, you can't vote until you complete your sentence* (Section 609.165, Subd. 1 Restoration of civil rights).
Mississippi If you have certain felony crimes on your record, you can't vote unless you receive a pardon from the governor. In other cases, you can vote even while in prison (Mississippi Constitution Art. 12, section 241).
Missouri If you have a felony conviction you must complete your sentence before you can vote (Missouri Constitution Art. 8, Section 2).
Montana You can vote if you have completed your prison sentence (Montana Constitution, Art. 5, Section. 2).
Nebraska If you have a felony conviction, you can't vote until two years after the sentence is completed, including any parole term (Nebraska Statutes, chapter 32, Section 32-313).
Nevada You can vote after your release from prison (Assembly Bill 431).
New Hampshire You can vote after your release from prison (RSA 607- A:2).
New Jersey You can vote after you complete your sentence (New Jersey Statutes Title 19, Elections 19 Section 4-1).
New Mexico You can vote after you complete your sentence (New Mexico Constitution, Art. VII, Section 1).
New York After Governor Andrew Cuomo issued an executive order, felons who are under parole or probation can vote.

Learn more on our page about felon voting rights in New York.

North Carolina You can vote after you complete your sentence (North Carolina Constitution Art. VI, Section 2).
North Dakota You can vote after your release from prison (North Dakota Statutes, Chapter 12.1-33).
Ohio You can vote after your release from prison (Ohio Revised Code, Section 2961.01).
Oklahoma You can vote after you complete your sentence.
Oregon You can vote after your release from prison (ORS 137.281).
Pennsylvania You can vote after you are released from prison.
Rhode Island You can restore your voting rights after your release from prison.
South Carolina You can vote after you complete your sentence (South Carolina Constitution, Art. 2).
South Dakota Your voting rights are restored after your release from prison (South Dakota Codified Law Section 12-4-18).
Tennessee Tenn. Const. Art. 1, Section 2 denies the right to vote to individuals who were convicted of an infamous crime unless you petition for restoration or the governor pardons you.
Texas You can vote after you complete your sentence (Texas Election Code 11.002).

Learn more on our page about felon voting rights in Texas.

Utah You can vote after your release from prison (Utah Code 20A-2-101.5).
Vermont You do not lose your right to vote.
Virginia You will lose your voting rights if you have a felony on your record unless the governor or another appropriate authority restores your right (Virginia Constitution, Art. 2, Section 1).
Washington You can vote after you complete your sentence. However, you may lose your rights if the sentencing court finds you did not comply with the terms of your legal financial obligations.
West Virginia You can vote after you complete your sentence.
Wisconsin You can vote after you complete your sentence.
Wyoming If you are a first time offender with a non-violent felony conviction, you can vote after your release from prison (W.S. Section 7-13-105). In other cases, the governor must restore your rights or give you a pardon for you to vote.

Completion of a sentence includes completion of parole or probation.

Note: State laws are always changing through legislative, judicial, or other means. While FindLaw works hard to ensure the accuracy of its legal resources, it's a good idea to thoroughly research the law or check with an attorney to make sure you have the most recent information.

Consult an Attorney If Your Voting Rights Are Violated

Regaining your right to vote and having a say in the political process of your country is very crucial. States have different laws and procedures when it comes to felon voting rights, which could make the process complicated. If you are uncertain about your voting rights or if you feel your rights were violated, consider speaking to a civil rights attorney.

Next Steps: Regain Your Voting Rights

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